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Der tod ist ein mühseliges geschäft

Der Tod Ist Ein Mühseliges Geschäft

»Andererseits aber«, fuhr K. fort und wandte sich hierbei an alle und hätte sich darbietendes Gespräch oder Geschäft oder Vergnügen sich entgehen lassen. sagte er, mühselig schluckend, »zu meiner Beruhigung ist es notwendig. und beschleunigst so den Tod eines Mannes, auf den du angewiesen bist.

der tod ist ein mühseliges geschäft

»Andererseits aber«, fuhr K. fort und wandte sich hierbei an alle und hätte sich darbietendes Gespräch oder Geschäft oder Vergnügen sich entgehen lassen. sagte er, mühselig schluckend, »zu meiner Beruhigung ist es notwendig. und beschleunigst so den Tod eines Mannes, auf den du angewiesen bist.

The ending is a little odd, but I don't mean that in a bad way! There just isn't any real resolution to Bolbol's story, but I think that's why I love it so much.

In real life, we don't always get closure or neat, even if ambiguous, endings to certain periods in our lives, and Bolbol is left at the end of the novel in such a way.

How the ending is handled is also another sign of Khaled Khalifa's skill as a writer because it's incredibly difficult for a writer to pull off an ambiguous ending that isn't really an ending at all, but Khalifa does it so authentically that that's exactly how it feels: authentic.

Lastly, the translation for the novel by Leri Price was superb. Sometimes I'm hesitant to read novels that have been translated from another language because so much of the original novel's meaning and language can get lost in the switch to English, but it was extremely well done.

If anything, I only wish that I were fluent in Arabic so that I could fully appreciate the novel in its original language since I'm sure English doesn't quite do it the amount of justice that would receive if I had read it in Arabic.

I have a feeling this will be a book I come back to again and again. I only wish I had the time and the words to write out just how truly powerful this book was for me.

Highly and thoroughly recommend. One of the best novels I have read this year. I only disliked the fact that the female character is not really explained throughout the book and you don't really get to know her, or only as kind of mediator between both brothers.

I wanted to read this because it is set in present day Syria. Unfortunately, the story is a little too meandering and unfocused for my tastes.

This novel, set in present day Syria, is my translated book for the month. It turned out to be another example of Death Bed Lit.

Abdel Latif, an elderly man from a village near Aleppo, lays dying in a Damascus hospital with his son Bolbol standing by. The old man extracts from Bolbol a promise to make sure he is buried in the family plot back in their village, Anabiya.

Anabiya is just a few hours drive from Damascus. How har This novel, set in present day Syria, is my translated book for the month.

How hard could it be? Bolbol contacts his older brother Hussein and his sister Fatima, convincing them to make the journey with him.

Hussein procures a small van, Fatima gathers provisions. They get the unembalmed body in the vehicle and set out.

Syria at this time is a war zone and the few hours' drive takes three days. Clogged roads, competing militias, checkpoints with long lines every few miles.

Due to the high death rate from continuous bombings, they had to take Abdel's body away from the hospital with only a death certificate and it begins to decay in the brutal heat.

Every difference, grudge and personality defect between the siblings boils up. In a mere pages, Khalifa relates the history of this family and what the war has done to them.

It is not all grim because a black humor pervades the tale giving a look into the Syrian soul and temperament. I kept trying to imagine how it would be to travel through such trying conditions.

Both novels won the Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature. The author is Syrian born and lives in Damascus, refusing to abandon his country despite the dangers created by its Civil War.

For that alone, I figured I could pay him the homage of reading this truly horrifying but finely written tale. Reading this book is hard work.

I never would have known this were it not for the fact of the Faulkner class I'm taking, but this book takes the idea of As I Lay Dying and adapts it to Syria, as three siblings try to take their father's body to where he wanted to be buried.

Shenanigans ensue and things get pretty bleak. There are a few other random Faulkner tributes like a corncob metaphor but I think you can know nothing at all about Faulkner and still enjoy the book.

It was on the Tournament of Books longlist so I wante I never would have known this were it not for the fact of the Faulkner class I'm taking, but this book takes the idea of As I Lay Dying and adapts it to Syria, as three siblings try to take their father's body to where he wanted to be buried.

It was on the Tournament of Books longlist so I wanted to give it a try. Translated by Leri Price from Khaled Khalifa's original, Death Is Hard Work tells the story of three siblings taking their father's body from Damascus to his home village of Anabiya, around 70km from Aleppo, to be buried alongside his sister in the ancestral plot.

A journey that would normally be routine - except Syria is suffering under a internecine civil war, and the trip involves passing through areas under the control of different factions, including the regime's brutal security forces and foreign Islamist fighters who have taken up the cause of the rebellion.

Literary comparisons in a review are typically lazy, but it is hard not to note the overlap with both Frankenstein in Baghdad , another novel set in a country riven by violence and where, as here the sight of body parts in the streets starts to become almost routine; and the Body section of 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World , which involves a perilous journey to bury a corpse.

The body is Abdel Latif, born in the village of Anabiya, but who 40 years ago moved to the town of S to teach, a town where the 3 siblings were both.

Anabiya is in rebel-held territory, and S is close to Damascus, seen by the ruling party as a hotbed of insurrection, and under permanent siege for the last 3 years.

Passionately pro-revolution, Abdel Latif, stays in S, but when his health deteriorates he is smuggled out of the town by pro-rebellion troops and handed into the care of his son Bolbol in Damascus.

Abdel Latif dies and his last wish, which he commands his son to carry out, is for his body to be buried in Anabiya. His death is also unusual, for being of natural causes: In recent months, when people died, no one bothered asking after the hows and the whys.

Bolbol summons his brother Hussein and sister Fatima, and the previously estranged siblings embark on the road trip together, a trip that in normal times might have taken hours but which takes them several days.

The brothers were two sides of the same coin: Hussein was the face of bravery and buffoonery, and Bolbol of cowardice and capitulation.

Both had lost the battle with life. As the trip progresses we get the different perspectives of all three as well as Abdel Latif's own history and that of others in the family, for example his recently widowed wife, his long-term secret love, who he married in the midst of the siege: Everything she had built was destroyed—the family, the house—the only thing she could do now was wait to die, but death remained such a distant prospect, in her mind.

She was gripped by fantasies of revenge for losses for which there was no possible restitution. After losing their compassion, a person becomes little more than another corpse abandoned by the roadside, one that should really be buried.

She knew that she was already just such a body, but she still needed to die before she could find peace under the earth.

And for her, dying was the hardest work of all. If Bolbol represents passive acquiescence to the regime, his father represents a different, perhaps over-idealistic, generation, their main focus not Syria itself, but rather the Palestinian cause.

Or maybe something about the respectable family Abdel Latif had always wanted, filled with successful, educated, socialist children working in respectable professions: Like all poor people you want your children to become doctors or engineers, but your uniqueness is a fantasy and the cost of it has buried us.

Another strong novel from the excellent shortlist of the National Book Award for Translated Literature. The meaning of everything changes: life, hope, frustration, despair.

Things lose their value, humans become killers and the killed, and time becomes ongoing, tied to a mysterious chord called the hope of survival.

Because it might be the last time that you are able to write, you do ordinary and regular things for the last time. You drink your coffee, hold your lover, go to work, and write for the last time.

View all 7 comments. I am thinking this may be one of my top ten this year and as such I want to fill the review with superlatives reflecting my enjoyment.

But one thing I noticed having finished the book, was the number of mixed and poor reviews. I am not sure whether the other reviewers and I came to the novel with different expectations, but for me the novel succeeded on multiple levels and was a five star read.

So rather than write superlatives, I will try and note a few reasons I liked the book. First, it displa I am thinking this may be one of my top ten this year and as such I want to fill the review with superlatives reflecting my enjoyment.

First, it displayed archetypal themes, and the author, "made them new. In this case the plot involves siblings honoring a father's death wish by taking his body on a journey back to his home town for burial with his sister, so the two main themes that resonate back to the epics are the caring of the dead and the journey.

I am immediately reminded of Gilgamesh and Enkidu or Achilles Hector and Patroclus in the Illiad For journey, we refer to the epics once again with the Odyssey and the Aeneid being examples.

Khalifa's treatment is wholly different and offers a unique perpective. Second, I liked the style and structure of the novel.

Khalifa used a type of understated existential prose reminiscent of Albert Camus' The Plague. I think this encourages the reader's response to be more philosophical than emotional and gets us to think on rather than react to the book, and this was a novel to be thought about after one finished.

I liked how Khalifa employed his back story through the memories of the characters in tension breaking flashbacks during the journey.

It disrupted the immediacy of the story but I think Khalifa was looking to tell a fuller story rather than just make a thriller.

It forces the reader to think. It reminded me how film noir or spy novels often used that structure and I thought of Graham Greene.

I might add that I thought the back stories were good subplots in this novel. Last, I saw the novel of a perfect example of a modern horror novel.

What made this novel so effective as a horror novel was the many levels of horror that were broached whether the visceral, atmospheric, aspect of traveling on a heavily trafficked road in bad weather while carrying a deteriorating body, or the psychological element that is displayed in each sibling's thoughts or actions, or the overall apocalyptic chaos they encounter on the trip the horror is apparent at every level.

I would like to see this filmed by a competent director. Enough babble! I think I conveyed my feelings about the novel and I hope some of you who share similar taste get to read the book.

View all 3 comments. Translated works can be cumbersome to read. The translator has a colossal job of getting ideas and thought along with words from one culture to another.

The Arabic culture is different in many ways from American culture. Yet, each sentence is complex and full of information and nuances that requires careful reading and rereading.

There is so much goi Translated works can be cumbersome to read. There is so much going on and communicated in this slip of a novel.

First, it takes place in Syria in the midst of a bloody and cruel civil war. Abdel Latif dies of old age in a hospital in Damascus.

Before he dies, he makes his youngest son promise that he will be buried in his ancestral village of Anabiya, which is a couple of hours from Damascus.

But, because Syria is under brutal warfare, and many roadblocks occur between the two places, this request is weighty. Bolbol, the youngest son, enlists his older brother and his sister to help in the request.

The horrors of the Syrian war are balanced by the absurdity of the war and of the journey. Khalifa deftly writes scenes that turns the readers stomach and makes the reader chuckle at the same time.

Explosions, air raids, corps, decimated villages are in every page. But the siblings find problems at every roadblock.

For instance, their father has an arrest warrant issued and the soldiers take the body into custody. As the siblings journey to the village, the half day journey takes on days.

Meanwhile the corpse is rotting, the stench is horrid, and it makes for sibling angst. Now the reader learns all the familial atrocities, real or imagined, that each one carries.

Khalifa uses these moments as humor fodder while the ambiance of the story is the horrific life of Syria. Khalifa, through this family drama, makes the reader live through the moment to moment, day to day horrors.

This novel will stay with me for a long time. A father's dying wish to be buried in his home town, the promise made by a son. Three siblings set out from the hospital in Damascus with the body of their deceased father, planning the two-hour drive to his ancestral village near Aleppo and the Turkish border.

This novella traces the lives of th "Rites and rituals meant nothing now This novella traces the lives of the 3 siblings - Bolbol, Fatima, and Hussein - their relationship with their father and previously deceased mother, and the landscape of civil war and strife in their country.

The journey of two hours extends to days as they pass through check points, detours, ghost towns, and as the corpse begins to decompose inside their van.

A story of grief and war, but also of connections, and putting past wrongs aside to come together in the moment. Khalifa - and Price's translation of his original Arabic - flow beautifully.

Er erzählt auch die Lebensgeschichten der drei, die sich fremd geworden sind und deren Träume längst zerplatzt sind. Hussain verdingt sich als Minibusfahrer, Fatima erhofft für ihre Kinder ein besseres Leben, und Bulbul, dem das Hauptaugenmerk des Erzählers gilt, verwendet aus Angst seine ganze Energie darauf, dem Regime keine Angriffsfläche zu bieten.

Auch von ihrem Vater erzählt Khalifa, der sich wenig für seine Kinder, dafür umso mehr für sich selbst und seinen Nachruhm interessiert hat.

Khalifa leitet den Verfall Syriens von viel weiter her als aus dem aktuellen Krieg. Und für die Zukunft sieht er schwarz.

Das erste Kapitel, in dem der Transport der Leiche beginnt, ist zum Beispiel überschrieben mit: "Wärst du doch ein Kümmelsack!

Donnerberg, U. Bitte zeichne mir ein Schaf. Wird es eng für Trump? Was den scheuen Räuber so faszinierend macht. Ohne Hormone geht gar nichts.

Intellektueller Schlag gegen die Dominanzkultur. Sie erzählt auf einer persönlichen Ebene auch von einer Familie und ihrem Unglück, Sehnsüchten, Lügen und Geheimnissen, für Bopp etwas höchst Vertrautes.

Der laut Bopp über allem schwebenden Frage der Identität im Krieg erteilt der Autor damit eine eher pessimistische Antwort, meint sie.

Rezensionsnotiz zu Neue Zürcher Zeitung, Die Willkür, Gewalt und Absurdität der Verhältnisse scheint auf, meint sie, staunend über Khalifas Fähigkeit, genaue Psychogramme seiner Figuren zu zeichnen.

Eine zwingende Lektüre, die ein versiegeltes, versehrtes Land von innen zeigt, so Schader. Rezensionsnotiz zu Süddeutsche Zeitung, Dass die Figuren in dem ersten auf Deutsch erscheinenden Roman des Syrers keine Helden sind, macht sie für Wüllenkemper erst greifbar.

Die Geschichte um drei Geschwister, die ihren toten Vater an seinen Geburtsort überführen wollen und dafür eine Reihe von Bedrohungen an Checkpoints und in Bombardements zu überstehen haben, der Bericht aus einem zerstörten Land, wirkt auf den Rezensenten weder anklagend noch sentimental, sondern nüchtern bis zum Sarkasmus.

BuchLink: Aktuelle Leseproben.

Where is this mysterious S? Is it a real place? Abhishek Likely not. I think it was intentionally kept shrouded. See all 3 questions about Der Tod ist ein mühseliges Geschäft….

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Sort order. Start your review of Der Tod ist ein mühseliges Geschäft. This story is from the front-lines of the on-going terror and civil war in Syria.

Although the son has had only cursory interaction with his older brother and sister over the last ten years, he convinces them to accompany him to take the body in a Volkswagen bus on what would be in normal times, a one-day-or-so trip to the burial site.

The trip turns into a hellish journey, an insane, Kafkaesque nightmare. And we are reminded of Kafka not only by the byzantine bureaucracy the three-some encounters at military checkpoints, but also by the body metamorphosing into worms.

We see through the eyes of the author and the main character how the brutality of the regime created its own revolution. Many rebels deserted the army with their weapons when they were disgusted by orders to shoot to kill demonstrators with no restrictions: women, children and elderly were fair game.

They opened fire on funeral processions. There is no accountability for soldiers of the regime: they can shoot or torture anyone for any reason — no questions asked.

So giving a soldier at a checkpoint a flippant answer can get you killed. Hospitals are prohibited from taking in rebel wounded.

Doctors who privately treat such wounded are targeted for murder by the regime. One woman whose doctor son was killed that way asked his medical colleagues to piece together his body after it was released by the police.

Nor can rebels be buried in traditional graveyards, so private ones spring up. There is the absurdity of the military wanting the body placed under arrest because he was a man wanted for joining the rebels.

It takes hours and sometimes days to get through a checkpoint. One checkpoint is manned entirely by Chechen soldiers who hardly speak Arabic.

One rebel-held checkpoint requires men to pass a test of religious knowledge to continue through. His father chose to live in a shell of his former home with walls missing.

The streets are filled with amputees. There are snipers along the highways, and bodies can be seen along roads left for the wild dogs that feed off them.

One night of the trip the family tries to sleep in the van in a field but dogs throw themselves at the van trying to get at the decaying body.

Not a pleasant book to read but neither are the daily headlines. So many! The author b. Much of his work has been banned or suppressed in his country.

Top photo from aljazeera. View all 16 comments. Abdel Latif, a man from the Aleppo region dies from old age, a rare feat in war torn Syria.

He makes his children promise to bury him in his home village, Anabiya. Reluctantly, the three estranged siblings embark in a perilous drive through the Syrian tragic landscape.

The road is sprinkled with hostile checkpoints, bombed villages, memories and people from the past and most oppressing with the silence between the three, each dealing with suppressed anger, loss, guilt and remorse.

The drive takes a lot more than it was planned due to the obstacles they encounter in the path and as the body decays and festers, the drift between the relationships of the siblings deepens and conflict will become imminent.

There are two time lines, the present trip that the siblings and the dead man take which swarms with hurt, war, death, hunger and ridiculous rules and the mostly sad memories of each character.

None of the them seem to have had a fulfilling life; each had their regrets and losses. The novel was well written but I had a problem.

I sometimes felt disconnected from the novel mainly due to the constant drifting in the past and I felt that the passing interrupted the flow.

At one point I was gutted by the horrors of war and of a dictatorial regime only to not care at all what happened to Fatima or other character.

I would have probably benefited from reading Faulkner novel, there might have been some references hidden inside to that classic but I missed them completely.

View 2 comments. View all 8 comments. This novel is a gorgeous meditation on death, grief, family, and war. It seems like it wouldn't take very long since essentially, the main plot of the book is this sibling trio taking their father's body to a town 2.

However, the reader doesn't just get to see the family dynamics between the siblings in the car; we're treated to their pasts and how they've shaped these people into who they are at the time the novel take This novel is a gorgeous meditation on death, grief, family, and war.

However, the reader doesn't just get to see the family dynamics between the siblings in the car; we're treated to their pasts and how they've shaped these people into who they are at the time the novel takes place.

Each and every character is richly fleshed out from beginning to end, and they come across as actual people right in front of you rather than characters on a page in a book.

The ending is a little odd, but I don't mean that in a bad way! There just isn't any real resolution to Bolbol's story, but I think that's why I love it so much.

In real life, we don't always get closure or neat, even if ambiguous, endings to certain periods in our lives, and Bolbol is left at the end of the novel in such a way.

How the ending is handled is also another sign of Khaled Khalifa's skill as a writer because it's incredibly difficult for a writer to pull off an ambiguous ending that isn't really an ending at all, but Khalifa does it so authentically that that's exactly how it feels: authentic.

Lastly, the translation for the novel by Leri Price was superb. Sometimes I'm hesitant to read novels that have been translated from another language because so much of the original novel's meaning and language can get lost in the switch to English, but it was extremely well done.

If anything, I only wish that I were fluent in Arabic so that I could fully appreciate the novel in its original language since I'm sure English doesn't quite do it the amount of justice that would receive if I had read it in Arabic.

I have a feeling this will be a book I come back to again and again. I only wish I had the time and the words to write out just how truly powerful this book was for me.

Highly and thoroughly recommend. One of the best novels I have read this year. I only disliked the fact that the female character is not really explained throughout the book and you don't really get to know her, or only as kind of mediator between both brothers.

I wanted to read this because it is set in present day Syria. Unfortunately, the story is a little too meandering and unfocused for my tastes.

This novel, set in present day Syria, is my translated book for the month. It turned out to be another example of Death Bed Lit. Abdel Latif, an elderly man from a village near Aleppo, lays dying in a Damascus hospital with his son Bolbol standing by.

The old man extracts from Bolbol a promise to make sure he is buried in the family plot back in their village, Anabiya.

Anabiya is just a few hours drive from Damascus. How har This novel, set in present day Syria, is my translated book for the month.

How hard could it be? Bolbol contacts his older brother Hussein and his sister Fatima, convincing them to make the journey with him.

Hussein procures a small van, Fatima gathers provisions. They get the unembalmed body in the vehicle and set out.

Syria at this time is a war zone and the few hours' drive takes three days. Clogged roads, competing militias, checkpoints with long lines every few miles.

Due to the high death rate from continuous bombings, they had to take Abdel's body away from the hospital with only a death certificate and it begins to decay in the brutal heat.

Every difference, grudge and personality defect between the siblings boils up. In a mere pages, Khalifa relates the history of this family and what the war has done to them.

It is not all grim because a black humor pervades the tale giving a look into the Syrian soul and temperament.

I kept trying to imagine how it would be to travel through such trying conditions. Both novels won the Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature.

The author is Syrian born and lives in Damascus, refusing to abandon his country despite the dangers created by its Civil War.

For that alone, I figured I could pay him the homage of reading this truly horrifying but finely written tale. Reading this book is hard work.

I never would have known this were it not for the fact of the Faulkner class I'm taking, but this book takes the idea of As I Lay Dying and adapts it to Syria, as three siblings try to take their father's body to where he wanted to be buried.

Shenanigans ensue and things get pretty bleak. There are a few other random Faulkner tributes like a corncob metaphor but I think you can know nothing at all about Faulkner and still enjoy the book.

It was on the Tournament of Books longlist so I wante I never would have known this were it not for the fact of the Faulkner class I'm taking, but this book takes the idea of As I Lay Dying and adapts it to Syria, as three siblings try to take their father's body to where he wanted to be buried.

It was on the Tournament of Books longlist so I wanted to give it a try. Translated by Leri Price from Khaled Khalifa's original, Death Is Hard Work tells the story of three siblings taking their father's body from Damascus to his home village of Anabiya, around 70km from Aleppo, to be buried alongside his sister in the ancestral plot.

A journey that would normally be routine - except Syria is suffering under a internecine civil war, and the trip involves passing through areas under the control of different factions, including the regime's brutal security forces and foreign Islamist fighters who have taken up the cause of the rebellion.

Literary comparisons in a review are typically lazy, but it is hard not to note the overlap with both Frankenstein in Baghdad , another novel set in a country riven by violence and where, as here the sight of body parts in the streets starts to become almost routine; and the Body section of 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World , which involves a perilous journey to bury a corpse.

The body is Abdel Latif, born in the village of Anabiya, but who 40 years ago moved to the town of S to teach, a town where the 3 siblings were both.

Anabiya is in rebel-held territory, and S is close to Damascus, seen by the ruling party as a hotbed of insurrection, and under permanent siege for the last 3 years.

Passionately pro-revolution, Abdel Latif, stays in S, but when his health deteriorates he is smuggled out of the town by pro-rebellion troops and handed into the care of his son Bolbol in Damascus.

Abdel Latif dies and his last wish, which he commands his son to carry out, is for his body to be buried in Anabiya.

His death is also unusual, for being of natural causes: In recent months, when people died, no one bothered asking after the hows and the whys.

Bolbol summons his brother Hussein and sister Fatima, and the previously estranged siblings embark on the road trip together, a trip that in normal times might have taken hours but which takes them several days.

The brothers were two sides of the same coin: Hussein was the face of bravery and buffoonery, and Bolbol of cowardice and capitulation.

Both had lost the battle with life. As the trip progresses we get the different perspectives of all three as well as Abdel Latif's own history and that of others in the family, for example his recently widowed wife, his long-term secret love, who he married in the midst of the siege: Everything she had built was destroyed—the family, the house—the only thing she could do now was wait to die, but death remained such a distant prospect, in her mind.

She was gripped by fantasies of revenge for losses for which there was no possible restitution. After losing their compassion, a person becomes little more than another corpse abandoned by the roadside, one that should really be buried.

She knew that she was already just such a body, but she still needed to die before she could find peace under the earth.

And for her, dying was the hardest work of all. If Bolbol represents passive acquiescence to the regime, his father represents a different, perhaps over-idealistic, generation, their main focus not Syria itself, but rather the Palestinian cause.

Or maybe something about the respectable family Abdel Latif had always wanted, filled with successful, educated, socialist children working in respectable professions: Like all poor people you want your children to become doctors or engineers, but your uniqueness is a fantasy and the cost of it has buried us.

Another strong novel from the excellent shortlist of the National Book Award for Translated Literature. The meaning of everything changes: life, hope, frustration, despair.

Things lose their value, humans become killers and the killed, and time becomes ongoing, tied to a mysterious chord called the hope of survival.

Because it might be the last time that you are able to write, you do ordinary and regular things for the last time. You drink your coffee, hold your lover, go to work, and write for the last time.

View all 7 comments. I am thinking this may be one of my top ten this year and as such I want to fill the review with superlatives reflecting my enjoyment.

But one thing I noticed having finished the book, was the number of mixed and poor reviews. I am not sure whether the other reviewers and I came to the novel with different expectations, but for me the novel succeeded on multiple levels and was a five star read.

So rather than write superlatives, I will try and note a few reasons I liked the book. First, it displa I am thinking this may be one of my top ten this year and as such I want to fill the review with superlatives reflecting my enjoyment.

First, it displayed archetypal themes, and the author, "made them new. In this case the plot involves siblings honoring a father's death wish by taking his body on a journey back to his home town for burial with his sister, so the two main themes that resonate back to the epics are the caring of the dead and the journey.

I am immediately reminded of Gilgamesh and Enkidu or Achilles Hector and Patroclus in the Illiad For journey, we refer to the epics once again with the Odyssey and the Aeneid being examples.

Khalifa's treatment is wholly different and offers a unique perpective. Second, I liked the style and structure of the novel.

Khalifa used a type of understated existential prose reminiscent of Albert Camus' The Plague.

I think this encourages the reader's response to be more philosophical than emotional and gets us to think on rather than react to the book, and this was a novel to be thought about after one finished.

I liked how Khalifa employed his back story through the memories of the characters in tension breaking flashbacks during the journey.

It disrupted the immediacy of the story but I think Khalifa was looking to tell a fuller story rather than just make a thriller.

It forces the reader to think. It reminded me how film noir or spy novels often used that structure and I thought of Graham Greene.

I might add that I thought the back stories were good subplots in this novel. Last, I saw the novel of a perfect example of a modern horror novel.

What made this novel so effective as a horror novel was the many levels of horror that were broached whether the visceral, atmospheric, aspect of traveling on a heavily trafficked road in bad weather while carrying a deteriorating body, or the psychological element that is displayed in each sibling's thoughts or actions, or the overall apocalyptic chaos they encounter on the trip the horror is apparent at every level.

I would like to see this filmed by a competent director. Enough babble! I think I conveyed my feelings about the novel and I hope some of you who share similar taste get to read the book.

View all 3 comments. Translated works can be cumbersome to read. The translator has a colossal job of getting ideas and thought along with words from one culture to another.

The Arabic culture is different in many ways from American culture. Yet, each sentence is complex and full of information and nuances that requires careful reading and rereading.

There is so much goi Translated works can be cumbersome to read. There is so much going on and communicated in this slip of a novel.

First, it takes place in Syria in the midst of a bloody and cruel civil war. Abdel Latif dies of old age in a hospital in Damascus.

Before he dies, he makes his youngest son promise that he will be buried in his ancestral village of Anabiya, which is a couple of hours from Damascus.

But, because Syria is under brutal warfare, and many roadblocks occur between the two places, this request is weighty.

Bolbol, the youngest son, enlists his older brother and his sister to help in the request. The horrors of the Syrian war are balanced by the absurdity of the war and of the journey.

Khalifa deftly writes scenes that turns the readers stomach and makes the reader chuckle at the same time.

Explosions, air raids, corps, decimated villages are in every page. But the siblings find problems at every roadblock. For instance, their father has an arrest warrant issued and the soldiers take the body into custody.

As the siblings journey to the village, the half day journey takes on days. Meanwhile the corpse is rotting, the stench is horrid, and it makes for sibling angst.

Now the reader learns all the familial atrocities, real or imagined, that each one carries. Khalifa uses these moments as humor fodder while the ambiance of the story is the horrific life of Syria.

Khalifa, through this family drama, makes the reader live through the moment to moment, day to day horrors. This novel will stay with me for a long time.

A father's dying wish to be buried in his home town, the promise made by a son. Three siblings set out from the hospital in Damascus with the body of their deceased father, planning the two-hour drive to his ancestral village near Aleppo and the Turkish border.

This novella traces the lives of th "Rites and rituals meant nothing now This novella traces the lives of the 3 siblings - Bolbol, Fatima, and Hussein - their relationship with their father and previously deceased mother, and the landscape of civil war and strife in their country.

The journey of two hours extends to days as they pass through check points, detours, ghost towns, and as the corpse begins to decompose inside their van.

A story of grief and war, but also of connections, and putting past wrongs aside to come together in the moment. Wird es eng für Trump? Was den scheuen Räuber so faszinierend macht.

Ohne Hormone geht gar nichts. Intellektueller Schlag gegen die Dominanzkultur. Politikwissenschaflerin Dhawan über Rassismus und Kolonialismus.

Fuchs und Mensch Feature. Medien und Meinungen vom Jetzt kostenlos herunterladen. Stilistisch nicht brillant, aber bestechend genau beobachtet.

Wer sich selbst und seinen Körper kennen lernen will, der muss das neue, rasant geschriebene Buch von Franca Parianen lesen.

Die Neurowissenschaftlerin erklärt gekonnt, wie Hormone uns formen. Zwischendurch melden sich sogar die Hormone persönlich zu Wort.

Katya Apekina erzählt von einem Schriftsteller, der seine Frau künstlerisch ausbeutet und seelisch zerstört. Mit solchen Erfahrungen befasst sich die Migrationsforscherin Naika Foroutan.

Die besten Sachbücher im Juni. App: Dlf Audiothek Jetzt kostenlos herunterladen. Mehr Franca Parianen: "Hormongesteuert ist immerhin selbstbestimmt" Ohne Hormone geht gar nichts Wer sich selbst und seinen Körper kennen lernen will, der muss das neue, rasant geschriebene Buch von Franca Parianen lesen.

Mehr Katya Apekina: "Je tiefer das Wasser" Kampf gegen die hässlichen Fische "Je tiefer die Wasser" setzt traditionell mit einem familiären Desaster ein, entwickelt sich aber zu einem beeindruckend komplexen Roman.

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Highly and thoroughly recommend. The brothers jethro cave two sides of the same coin: Hussein was the face of bravery and buffoonery, and Bolbol of cowardice and capitulation. The drive takes a lot alarm cobra staffel 43 than it was planned due to the obstacles they encounter in the path and as the body decays and festers, the drift between the relationships of the siblings deepens and conflict will become imminent. Mehr Katya Apekina: "Je baby tv das Wasser" Kampf gegen die hässlichen Fische "Je tiefer die Wasser" setzt traditionell mit einem familiären Desaster ein, entwickelt sich aber zu einem beeindruckend komplexen Roman. They opened fire on funeral processions. der tod ist ein mГјhseliges geschГ¤ft

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Der Tod Ist Ein Mühseliges Geschäft Video

Der Tod Ist Ein Mühseliges Geschäft Video

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